My main source of inspiration and renewal, in life as well as art, has always been natural spaces. What interests me is the complexity of the space, the constant transformations taking place that are impossible to make material. So in the imaginary landscapes I draw, there is always movement and ambiguity. My training in designing typefaces has heightened my awareness of how the edges between things define our physical world, of how we perceive space through our recognition of contrast and texture. I think this way of seeing is one of the keys to the mystery of how we create correspondences between, say, an abstract brushstroke and a memory of a babbling brook. I'm interested in leaving the means of illusion, the maker's marks, visible to the viewer, whom I think of as a traveler in my paintings. 

Today artists are frequently asked how their work relates to society's problems, or how it benefits the entire community. I find this hard to answer. It's like differentiating short-term from long-term investment gains. My ideas on this are definitely old-school. I believe that beauty is humanity's refuge and healer, and that art seeks to make us experience beauty even if it is depicting the opposite.

Littoral

At Studio e gallery in Seattle. Presented by Cullom Gallery. 
The show has passed, but the catalog is available from blurb.com

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